Tag Archives: Book review

Draft No. 4, by John McPhee

“It takes what it takes” (William Shawn, former editor of The New Yorker) “Get that boy from the Old Vic” (Winston Churchill, referring to Richard Burton) “Write on subjects in which you have enough interest on your own to see … Continue reading

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Keeping at It, by Paul A. Volcker

Paul Volcker, who died this last December at the age of 92, is some sort of almost demi-god among people interested in central banking, monetary policy, and banking regulation; in other words, people like me. I was hence extremely interested … Continue reading

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The Fifth Risk, by Michael Lewis

When I was at the Bank of England, I remember discussing with someone over a coffee about the need to screen new candidates for a willingness to work as public servants. The idea—as argued by my counterpart—was that people who … Continue reading

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National Populism, by Eatwell and Goodwin

National populists prioritize the culture and interests of the nation, and promise to give voice to a people who feel that they have been neglected, even held in contempt, by distant and often corrupt elites. The result of the Brexit … Continue reading

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Sapiens, by Yuval Noah Harari

“… we are on the threshold of both heaven and hell, moving nervously between the gateway of the one and the anteroom of the other. History has still not decided where we will end up, and a string of coincidences … Continue reading

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Top three books I read in 2019

I managed to reach my goal of reading 24 books in 2019. Ideally it should have been a simple linear process–you know, one book after the other, at more or less a pace of two a month–but it was not. … Continue reading

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Reality is not what it seems, by Carlo Rovelli

I have been fascinated by astrophysics for a while. When I was younger, I used to read Stephen Hawking’s books as soon as they hit the stores. There is something fascinating in imagining the structure of the universe, defying common … Continue reading

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Post-Truth, by Lee McIntyre

The very concept of objective truth is fading out of the world. Lies will pass into history. —George Orwell The book Post-Truth, by Lee McIntyre, opens with the above quote by George Orwell. Orwell, in fact, opens almost every chapter … Continue reading

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Hitch 22, by Christopher Hitchens

“The man had more wit, style, and substance than a few civilisations I can name” (Sam Harris remembering to Christopher Hitchens) I don’t think I have ever read an autobiography (or memoirs, which is more precise in this case) in … Continue reading

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Justice, by Michael J. Sandel

Michael J. Sandel is a professor at Harvard University who has been teaching a course called Justice for many years. In it, Professor Sandel talks about the different approaches to morality and justice, from Aristotle to Rawls, Kant and Mills. And … Continue reading

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